The Sand Hollow Regional Pipeline: Securing Water for the Future

The Sand Hollow Regional Pipeline water project is an 11.5-mile culinary water transmission line, which is expected to begin construction in early 2016, courtesy of the WCWCD (Washington County Water Conservancy District). The WCWCD was first founded in the early 60s to oversee Washington County’s water needs.

Charged with safeguarding, increasing, controlling and ensuring critical water supplies for southwestern Utah, the WCWCD is in a never-ending struggle between supply and demand to deliver a safe, maintainable water supply for existing and future generations for the greater St. George area.

Currently, the WCWCD oversees the administration of the areas many reservoirs, culinary pipelines, private water wells, County water storage tanks, water treatment facilities, hydropower plants, diversion dams and host of other projects. The system is currently capable of pumping more than 35 million gallons of water a day to the many nearby thirsty communities of St. George, Washington, Hurricane, Santa Clara, Ivins, Toquerville, La Verkin and the town of Virgin.

The Sand Hollow Regional Pipeline: Securing Water for the Future

The Sand Hollow Regional Pipeline: Securing Water for the Future

The Washington County Water Conservancy District has long planned the installation an 11.5-mile culinary water pipeline – a.k.a. the Sand Hollow Regional Pipeline – the purpose of this pipeline is to provide a consistent source of culinary water to the communities of St. George, Washington and Hurricane. Projected to cost approximately $14 million, and likely to start construction in 2016, the Sand Hollow Regional Pipeline will increase overall system productivity and safety, allowing the WCWCD to augment water supplies from the deep and plentiful Sand Hollow aquifer during times of scarcity and drought.

Securing water for future growth, Southern Utah’s newest water source will be pumped from the wells near the Sand Hollow Reservoir, trek along the southern corridor through Warner Valley, eventually connecting to the present St. George and Washington municipal water systems.

( Photo Courtesy of The Washington County Water Conservancy District)

Learn More about the Washington County Water Conservancy District And How You Might Help Protect Our Future Water Supplies…